About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CNNW 14
CNBC 3
CSPAN 2
MSNBCW 2
CSPAN2 1
KQED (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and new details about putin's conversation with president obama. senior white house correspondent jim akosta joins me now with details about that call. jim, what do you know? >> reporter: first thing to point out before i detail that phone call, we're getting word that the president is at a local fund-raiser in the washington, d.c. and told people at the fund-raiser that we may be able to deescalate this crisis in his words. the u.s. may be able to deescalate the crisis in the coming days so interesting to hear the president using the words, perhaps a hopeful sign about the way the white house feels about what's happening in ukraine at this point. but getting to that phone call, yes, as we all know it took place on saturday. 90 minutes long and according to a senior administration official briefing reporters on that phone call earlier this evening, the president and vladimir putin spent much of that time during that phone call debating the facts on the ground with respect to what's happening on the ground in ukraine. russian president basically saying that he's trying to defend the ri
can deliver, beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> clearly the administration is getting ready to act. no decision made yet on whether to impose those sanctions or, indeed, which sanctions to impose but they want to have the options ready. and today we heard the president warn that his goal is to isolate russia and make its actions in ukraine very costly. with russian troops now swarming, sovereigning ukrainian territory, preparing likely sanctions against russia. president obama vowing today to make russia's military intervention a costly proposition. >> what we're indicating to the russians is that if, in fact, they continue on the projectory that they are on, we are going to have a negative impact on russia's economy and its status in the world. >> reporter: the possible sanctions include freezing the overseas assets of russian individuals and companies, banning travel for russian leaders and businessmen and at the more extreme end, blocking some russian banks from the international financial system, an enormously costly situation for russ
. let's bring in with our national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> wolf, officials are attempting to de-escalate the crisis and avoiding any moves that may further inflame the situation. does russia expand its military intervention or does it pull back? on the ground in ukraine, there's a volatile mix of armed forces and emotions, which we saw flair up today. today in crimea, russian and ukrainian forces in a dramatic and dangerous standoff. weapons drawn and here a threat to open fire. >> i said stop! i'm serious. i'll shoot at your legs. >> reporter: and as secretary of state john kerry arrived in the ukrainian capital of kiev, a war of words. russian president vladimir putin and secretary kerry trading die metric clee opposed views of the crisis. back and forth. >> translator: the acting president, of course, is not legitimate. >> the elected representatives of the people of ukraine, they overwhelmingly approve the new government. >> reporter: and back and forth. >> translator: citizens of ukraine, both russian and ukrainian, what worries them? they are worried a
with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto here tw latest. jim? >> i think you could say today we saul the full yin and yang of the u.s. policy response to the crisis in crimea. on the other side, secretary of defense chuck hagel demonstrating the u.s. commitment to its nato allies with the deployment of some aircraft and the cancellation-of nato contacts with russia. on the diplomatic side, we saw the opening of a diplomatic path to solving the crisis, the so-called off ramp u.s. officials have mentioned before, still undefined, kerry said, but a start. >> reporter: u.s. and russian diplomats face to face for the first time since the start of the crisis in crimea. secretary of state john kerry said they are now negotiating a diplomatic path to ending it. >> we are committed to working with russia. together with our friends and allies in an effort to provide a way for this entire situation to find the road to deescalation. >> reporter: russian and ukrainian officials, however, did not meet. >> why didn't you meet lavrov today? >> reporter: but as the diplomats talk or don
indicates the degree to which russia is on the wrong side of history in this. >> jim maceda joins us now from moscow. jim, we've been talking about this, do you see this as a pull back and a lowering of tensions herely vladmy putin or is it just coincidence? >> hi, julia. it's not questions dense. it wasn't coincidence when they games were called five or on six days ago to take place along the russian/ukrainian border and it's not questiocoincidence tha they're ending today. vladimir putin could just as well have changed, for whatever reason, changed tend date. if this does happen, keep in mind, it was ordered that we haven't seen any indication of a pullback. the -- certainly if these war games do come to an end, it's going to mean that that massive show of force, we're talking about 150,000 troops, 900 tanks, 200 warships and airplanes. i mean, this should really bring the temperature down just in the seeing of and the doing of that kind of pullback. so russia has built up a fourth -- on crimea and division 5, 15,000, 16,000. it has complete operational control of crimea and it's still
cost benefit analysis, ukraine is hugely important to russia. and i want to maintain high jim any over it. and these incidental sanctions can i weather them and in due course the united states and europe will back off them because they don't have staying power. i will get what they want and they won't hurt me that much. that's their calculus. what's our calculus? >> ambassador, thank you, sir. enjoy london. >> thank you. >> and general bob scales insists russian president putin is bluffing that u.s. intervention must be on the table. i will tell you most people have military fatigue and you put it on the table. >> well, first of all understand russian military forces are very weak. they don't have a draft army. not a single stealth fighter. their navy can't get out of ports. it it really is the gang that couldn't shoot straight. we have still a very strong military. we ought to leverage that asymmetry. is that a threat or actually a follow-through? there are two things there. one is a threat to sort of scare them because they have a pathetic military and the other one is to actually co
between president obama and president putin on saturday. it was reportedly 90 minutes. jim acosta literally just walked out of a white house briefing. what more have you found out about the crucial call which i think is fair to say went a pretty long time. >> it did, erin. it's not often we get a lot of details about a 90-minute phone call between the president and any leader of any country. we talked with some senior administration officials here at the white house about the situation in ukraine, and about that 90-minute phone call. according to the senior administration official, the president spent much of that time, and this goes to perhaps the whole reason why this crisis is unfolding, the president spent most of the time basically challenging putin on his facts that vladimir putin was basically saying that he's stepping in or that russia has a right to defend the interests of ethnic russians in ukraine. and that the president spent much of that the phone call basically disagreeing with vladimir putin. so i think that that goes to what we've been hearing over the last several
this that is unrelated. you heard jim talk about the un envoy sent to crimea. that was threatened and not kidnapped. he is now safe and preparing to leave ukraine. several armed men threatened special envoy robert sari. they blocked him at a coffee shop. break this down for us. what happened and what kind of threat was this? how did he escape the coffee shop? >> we heard jim saying someone will get hurt. this un envoy has his diplomatic mission cut short in crimea. it just arrived. he visited a naval base and was leaving when armed men, 10 to 15 in number, not everyone with weapons surrounded him and demanded he leave crimea immediately and go to the airport. he got into the car he came with and refused to get out and the men blocked the car. they then were threatening him. he was described as shaken and not physically hurt. he walk and sought refuge. the late news is that the united nations is saying they are taking a late flight out and will return shortly to kiev to continue his mission. cut short by today's incident, the words of the united nation spokesman office here in new york. secretary genera
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
on ukraine. let's bring in our senior white house correspondent, jim acosta. jim, the white house says it won't be sending a presidential delegation to the paralympic games in sochi, russia that, are about to begin. is this more boy costs? it looks like the g-8 summit in june the u.s. was planning on participating in, that may be gone, as well. >> reporter: that's right. and you heard secretary of state john kerry say, wolf, it may become the g-7. that russia may be expelled. want to pick up on something you were talking about with anderson cooper about that alleged ultimatum from russia to ukrainian forces about crimea. there is a state department conference call going on right now, wolf, and a state department spokeswoman, jen psaki, said they don't have any independent confirmation that ultimate yum has been issued. but if that had occurred, it would in their view constitute a dangerous escalation. so that quick response from the white house to those events, even though the russians are saying that that did not occur. you mentioned the word from the white house earlier this morning that, y
to this ukraine crisis. our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto, monitoring what's going on. and, you know, these diplomats, u.n. envoy basically held there. it getting ugly. but maybe lavrov and kerry, they do have a personal relationship that goes way back. maybe they can come up with something. >> they do. relationship that helped with that chemical weapons deal in certi syria. you look at the incident with the u.n. envoy and other skirmishes. you remember yesterday we saw ukrainian and russian soldiers go nose to nose and shots fired in the air. this is why you need diplomacy now. you need the sides talking to each other, to deescalate. because you have a very volatile mix of guys with guns on the ground there, and emotions that have been stoked up by russian propaganda. and remember, these gangs, these ununiformed gangs, kind of pro-russian militias, there is a russian hand in that. that's a tool of russian power on the ground there. this is not happening by accident. those guys coming together. and you know, we've talked about this before. once you get that genie out of the
is going to lose, the russian people are going to lose. >> jim maceda joins us from moscow. a "new york times" article quotes angela merkel having had a telephone conversation with vladimir putin saying she's not sure he is in touch with reality and he is in another world. what does this mean for an escalation of the situation here, do you think? >> what it means is we don't know what will happen next because we can't really anticipate what putin will do. putin is a product of the cold war. for him, no matter how you try to convince him otherwise, anything west of ukraine is enemy territory for him. and he in his own mind is seeing nato creeping up ever so closer -- or closely to his boarders. now, you mentioned secretary kerry going to kiev. that hopefully will calm the waters a little bit, at least keep kiev from doing something unintentionally or that unintentionally as ka lates the situation. but it is now true that the west has mobilized at least diplomatically against vladimir putin's military takeover of crimea. as you say, it's not firmly in his hands. that it's really, julia, u
's political and economic crisis? cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto explains. >> reporter: there's a lot of questions about russia's interest in the ukraine as well as the west. first a reminder here. ukraine is in europe not a million miles away, the capital few municipal-bond miles away that americans travel to all the time, paris, london, rome. western border key u.s. aslice, slovakia, hungary and romania, poland. ukraine not a member of nato but there's been talk about bringing them in. let's get a better sense of russia's interest there. you look at crimea. on the tip of that peninsula, the sevastopol military headquarters. access to the black sea, mediterranean, atlantic, essential for russia and first place that many of those 6,000 and even more russian troops went when they crossed the border from russia into crimea. sovereign ukrainian territory. let's look inside the country as well because there's a split. western part of the country here liens towards europe, 5% of the population in these parts speak ethnic russian. eastern part 75% here speak russian, ethnic f
, but in the second part of his story on how obamacare could devastate home health care, jim ingle reports democrats are vulnerable because the administration's moves will disproportionately hurt women. >> the administration's cuts to home health care providers, mostly women, was mystifying to politicians of both parties, as well as care givers like dr. david fischer, who makes house calls to treat seniors in their homes, fulfilling one of the promises of obamacare. >> the home health services people are receiving is actually bending the cost curve down. and i think if we focus more on that aspect of our health care system, we'll bend that cost curve even further. >> then why cut funds for home health care workers? his eyes and ears with home bound seeners letting him known when someone falls or gets sick, like yeah vaughn, who had pneumonia, but treated at home, avoiding expensive trips to the er or hospital. >> for the cost of one er visit, you can pay for a year's worth of home physicians. >> that may be why more than half of the senate signed a letter objecting to the cuts after government analy
national correspondent jim ingle reports it has a lot to do with this fall's elections. >> president obama's steadily delaying and dismantling his own health care law as he prepares to offer another delay in obamacare, one to postpone the political pain of cancelling millions of plans in the individual market just like last fall. >> they're going to get cancellation notices again sometime around october 1 or slightly before, and the same political issue that erupted last year would erupt again in 2014 right before the election. >> it's just getting past the 2014 elections, and it's unfortunate, but i think it means that some of his candidates in the senate are in trouble. >> at the end of last year, some 6 million people on the individual market were told their policies were canceled and forced into obamacare often with more expensive policies. having promised that people could keep their plans and doctors no matter what, the president tried to apologize. >> there's no doubt that the way i put that forward unequivocally ended up not being accurate. >> then he urged insurers and state insur
on ukraine. joining us now for a discussion of the coverage, jim pinkerton, contributing writer for the americany go zone and alan colmes, host of the alan colmes show, also a fox news contributor. let's get it underway, gentlemen. here is what that "the washington post" editorial says in its opening paragraph. for five years, president obama has led a foreign policy based more on how he thinks the world should operate than on reality. it was a world in which the tide of water is receding, quoting a president there, and the united states could, without much risk, radically reduce the size of its armed forces. other leaders in the vision would behave rationally and in the interest of their people and the world. invasions, brute force, great power, gains and shifting alliances. these were things of the past. so jim, the media are coming to a different point of view now? >> i think some are. "new york times" asked if obama tough enough and the "usa today" called it response late and lame, unquote. i th media, not unlike what happened with jimmy carter in the late 1970's when the ne
burning up the phone lines lately. >> the diplomacy continuing full speed ahead. let's hope it works. jim acosta at the white house, thank you. >>> let's go to paris, our foreign affairs reporter elise lavin is there. intense meetings today. the secretary said he'd rather be where all of the action is right now as far as the diplomacy is concerned. did you get the sense that there's any ground for serious optimism right now? >> wolf, i would say cautious optimism. they didn't get that meeting between russian foreign minister lav love and the ukrainian foreign, they've been trying to get together all day kerry met with lavrov. then they sat down together. you had that call between angela merkel in which she's pitching this german/french plan that has some elements that the russians would like. tomorrow secretary kerry will go to rome and meet with foreign minister lavrov again. you have a seedling, if you will, of a diplomatic process. and everyone wants to de-escalate the situation. but i will say, wolf, the state department just sent out a fax sheet and it's called president putin's fict
said is really concerned. they want to iron it out in a united peaceful fashion. >> jim, talk a little bit about the concern from the perspective of the administration. russia is so key in so many discussions. you are talking about iran. you are talking about syria. so key and also such a thorn in the side of u.s. diplomacy in the u.s. reaching objectives. what does this mean for those other efforts? >> regional and global as you say. russia is central to any possible solution in syria. russia is central to the nuclear deal being negotiated and a difficult with iran. as the relationship runs into trouble over ukraine, the department said that russia is good at compartmentalizing these issues and can focus on one or the other. these are personal. there is a breech of trust here. also to jill's point. i think it's important. president obama lnchsed this. offering in effect an off-ramp saying you have your concerns in the eastern part of the country. let's address the concerns so that one, to remove that excuse if it needs an excuse to allow the troops to come in. also a face saving move.
, the longview. we need to take a long view here. the panel will include four experts including jim dobbins' predecessor. it will be moderated by andrew wilder who heads the center for south and central asia here at the u.s. institute of peace. the second panel will be on the future of media in afghanistan. again, four distinguished david as chaired by moderator from voices of america. we hope that you can conclude from today's program that afghanistan still matters to the united states. america's national security therest are best served by emergence of a stable and prosperous afghanistan. this objective can still be and what has been accomplished in afghanistan over the last decade offers some grounds for optimism that we can achieve this objective. afghanistan has made great progress over the last 12 years in health, education, women's rights and economic development. you will hear about that today in these remarks. you will also hear about the political progress that the afghan people have made. a presidential election is scheduled for this coming april 5. for the first time, there is t
correspondent jim sciutto. there's so many policies and cultures. it seems far away but it isn't. >> ukraine is in europe, kiev is miles away from rome, paris, london, that kind of thing and we have u.s. allies just to the west, poland, slovakia, hungary, romania. the u.s. is required to defend these countries militarily if they come under threat. >> crimea, appropriately colored red. why? >> because it has that pull toward russia. russia, right on the tip of russia, it's the headquarters of their black sea fleet, their on warm water port, all of the ports up here are cold, they don't have access to them in the winter. this is key. it's key when those thousands of russian troops moved into crimea, it where they went. >> people will remember this place throughout history. you had famous things happening here as part of its separation, we were talking earlier, florence nightingale. >> that's right, long ties between this part of the world and seems a million miles away in europe. >> the charge of the light brigade back in the 1850s. this went against the wrong front there and it proved very co
augustine is the new veteran director. nice to have you back. marine corps veteran jim marszalek now serves as dav national service director and his fellow marine corps veteran, barry janowski leads as executor of her in cold springs, kentucky. good to have you back, too. and with us today is ms. susan miller was elected to the office of national commander of the dav auxiliary. ms. miller previously served as registered nurse with the veterans health administration, and i note that ms. miller's son, trent, is a member of the united states army, recently serving in his second deployment to afghanistan. gentlemen and ms. miller, thank you for your leadership and for your service. i look forward to working with each of you in your new roles, continue to work with those of you that are continuing and the roles that you've had for a number of years but i would also like to recognize the dav members from my home state of florida who may be with us today but if you could just raise your hand out so we can say hello. isn't this just like home? this is just like him. [laughter] welcome to those from
alerts plus. the multi million dollar profollow owe she manages with jim cramer. >> investors on edge, and they are selling stocks as the conflict with ukraine and russia escalates. is there anything the u.s. can do? >> warren buffet speaks. what does the world's famous investor think? we talk to him about that, the economy and more. >> winter storms kept car shoppers at home for the second straight month. will deal es off
. hi, jim. what's the intention here do you think from the russian government? >> reporter: well, the russian government wants two things, to exert its influence in the region but at the same time it doesn't want yet i think nor do other analysts we've spoken here to rock the boat too much. there's no question, ross, texts have spiked in the past 24 hours just as russia's foreign ministry came out condemning large scale human rights violations against its ethnic russians in the ukraine, the russian defense ministry confirmed that fighter jets were now on high alert along the border with ukraine that's of course part of the surprise, war games we've been reporting on since yesterday including long range aircraft, warships as well as some 150 troops and some 900 tanks. the main flash point is ukraine's crimea peninsula, strategic for russia, the home of the black sea fleet, scuffles broke out yesterday between proand anti-russian protesters outside crimea's parliament. overnight the building was seized by armed men speaking russian with rpgs, sniper rifles, in effect vigilantes who
to the gentleman from ohio, our friend and colleague on the house ways and means committee, jim renacci. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized for two minutes. mr. renacci: mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of h.r. 4118, the simple fairness act. according to a recent gallup poll, 51% of americans disapprove of the president's health care law and for good reason. the rollout of the failed misguided law was nothing short of disast russ. it's played whips by preventing many americans from purchasing health insurance from the federal and state exchanges. through the president's -- though the president promised lower costs, many are facing the reality of higher premiums and a steep penalty if they cannot afford the plans that are offered. recently, the administration delayed the employer mandate for a second time, leaving intact the mandate that requires individuals to purchase health insurance or pay a fine. the bill before us today would ensure that no american would be forced to pay the individual mandate penalty tax in 2014. it is evident to this chambe
for having me. >> tomorrow, we'll speak with jim demint and russell simmons will join us here on set. >>> and plenty of enthusiasm last night at the oscars. that is until louis berg dorff ran into larry david. >> "morning joe"? this is an insult to "morning joe," okay? you're insulting "morning joe." >> look at how good looking i am. >> there's no insult here. >> joe doesn't care about show business. >> who are you wearing? you look wonderful. >> who am i wearing? who gives a [ bleep ]. who am i wearing. >> when you get in a scene, matthew mcconaughey beats his chest and hums -- >> are you out of your mind? >> maybe, a little bit. >> i would think about, what would larry david do. >> and you do that? >> i act accordingly. it's so hard. it's really hard. yeah. ooh, what do i do now? >> i don't know. >> it's very hard. ♪ ♪ ♪ millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fra
because they're the real deal. >> what has happened to syracuse? >> this has not been jim boeheim's best offensive or defensive team. but for the first 25 games, they operated at an incredibly high level of efficiency. they made plays at a level far above the way they normally played. their numbers aren't that different from last year. last year at the end of the season, georgetown blew them out. they lost games toward the end of the season, they couldn't score. georgetown held them to 35 points in washington, d.c. people were thinking it's over for syracuse. look at the final four. will that happen this year? i don't know. they have jeremy grant out, he's got a back issue, has not played much lately. trevor coony, their terrific shooter, has not been able to find shots. they're not a great offensive team. they're still dangerous but they have to get their mojo back a bit. >> you talked about one of my alma maters, florida gators. they're really good. >> billy donovan is a hall of fame coach. he's not a good coach, he's a great coach. they lost a lot from last year, they've gone to the e
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)